Guests from Stanford, workshops about spatial history och distant reading

Methods for distant reading (Ryan Heuser, Stanford University)

Wednesday 5/9 13.15 -15 at the new Art Campus and HUMlab X
http://www.doodle.com/vymubh6puyd2q6hb (Methods for distant reading)
The workshop is part of the collaboration between Umeå universitet and Stanford University and is financed by Knut och Alice Wallenberg’s Foundation

Distant reading, as Franco Moretti defined it in “Conjectures on World Literature,” “is a condition of knowledge: it allows you to focus on units that are much smaller or much larger than the text: devices, themes, tropes—or genres and systems.” This workshop will present for discussion the various methods used in the Stanford Literary Lab to see past individual texts, as it were, to these other units that make possible a new and more “distant” knowledge. The history of the Lab and its investigations of genre, historical semantics, style, and dramatic networks will be discussed, with an emphasis on the methods, tools and concepts that have informed these projects: such as stylometry, correlation mining, natural language processing and social network analysis.

Methods for spatial history (Jake Collidge, Stanford University)

Thursday 6/9 10.15-12
http://www.doodle.com/3d9ewfhc2pqxc4ak (Methods for spatial history)
The workshop is part of the collaboration between Umeå universitet and Stanford University and is financed by Knut och Alice Wallenberg’s Foundation

The core of the Spatial History Project’s methods can be situated in the field of historical geographic information science/systems (Historical GIS). This work extends the conceptual framework of GIS–the representation and analysis of phenomena on the earth’s surface in digital form as layers of vector-based points, lines, polygons and raster-based pixel fields–to the investigation of historic processes. This is often only possible by digitizing primary source documents–creating digital versions of analog/pre-digital sources that can then be used in data analysis and visualization software. Owing to the challenges posed by the dimension of time in historical research, and the complexity of historical social networks, among others, the Spatial History Project increasingly incorporates additional data visualization methods that complement and augment map-based views, including charts, graphs, and network diagrams. Due to the inherently labor-intensive and cross-disciplinary nature of this type of research, our projects are necessarily collaborative, bringing together researchers with a variety of backgrounds/knowledges and levels of technical expertise. This talk will discuss collaborative methods employed by our researchers using recent works as examples.

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